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Associate of Science in Mathematics and Science
Course Descriptions

 
Core Courses

INF 100
Information Literacy (1 unit)

This course prepares the student for college level research. Students learn to develop a search strategy, locate and evaluate material from a variety of sources and in a range of formats, and compile a bibliography and footnotes.



SCI 100
Computer Applications for Scientists & Engineers (3 units: 2 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

This course introduces the use of computer applications to create a technical project proposal. Problem-solving methods and practices are introduced, and research and data are collected using the Internet and other sources. The course emphasizes the use of word processing, presentation, spreadsheet, and web-based software to develop and present a technical project proposal.



Mathematics and Science Courses

CHE 150A
General Chemistry for Scientists & Engineers I (5 units: 4 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

This course is the first in the chemistry sequence for majors in biology, chemistry, engineering, or other physical sciences. This course covers fundamental chemical principles with emphasis on: atomic structure, bonding, periodicity, nomenclature, reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, physical states of matter, molecular equilibrium, acid-base concepts, and oxidation reductions. A laboratory program complements lecture.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in high school chemistry or CHE 130; proficiency in high school physics or PHY 120; proficiency in high school algebra, geometry, and trigonometry or MAT 100



CHE 150B
General Chemistry for Scientists and Engineers II (5 units: 4 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

This course is the second of a chemistry sequence for majors in biology, chemistry, engineering, or other physical sciences. This course covers fundamental chemical principles with emphasis on organic chemistry, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, coordination compounds, and nuclear chemistry. A laboratory program complements lecture.

Prerequisite: CHE 150A



EGR 100
Introduction to Engineering (3 units: 2 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

This course is an introduction to engineering through hands-on design projects, case studies, and problem-solving using computers. Students learn about the various aspects of the engineering profession and acquire non-technical skills, such as communication, teamwork, and the ability to deal with ethical dilemmas. The course supports students in their efforts to succeed in engineering through personal and professional development.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in high school algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, or equivalent



EGR 200
Engineering Mechanics—Statics (2 units)

This course studies particles and rigid bodies in equilibrium. It includes applications to particles and two- and three-dimensional structural systems using ordinary and vector algebra. Topics include free body diagrams, centroids and center of gravity, shear and bending moment diagrams, concentrated and distributed loads, moments of inertia, and friction.

Prerequisites: MAT 121, sophomore status



EGR 225
Introduction to Materials (3 units: 2 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

In this course the student studies atomic and crystal structures; imperfections and atom movement; phase equilibriums and transformations; boundaries; heat treatment of metals; and the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of engineering materials.

Prerequisites: CHE 150A, PHY 150A, MAT 121, sophomore status



EGR 250
Introduction to Circuit Analysis (4 units: 3 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

This course includes circuit laws and nomenclature, resistive circuits with DC sources, ideal operational amplifier, controlled sources, natural and complete response of simple circuits, steady state sinusoidal analysis, and power calculations. It covers basic instruments and experimental techniques in electrical engineering: oscilloscopes, function generators, frequency counters, and multiple-use meters. Students learn measurements of voltage, current frequency response, transient response, and computer simulation of circuits.

Prerequisites: PHY 150B, MAT 220 (may be taken concurrently), sophomore status



GSC 250
The Evolution of the Earth and Life on Earth through Time (3 units)

This course is an integrated study of the nature of Earth materials, geologic time, and the history of Earth and its life forms. The class is a hybrid physical and historical geology course that combines a lecture and laboratory experience.

Prerequisites: GSC 150, GSC 150A



MAT 121
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (4 units)

This is the second course in calculus and analytic geometry for students majoring in mathematics, physical science, computer science, or engineering. It includes logarithmic and exponential functions, inverse trigonometric functions, topics in analytic geometry, techniques of integration, polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series, further applications of integration, and an introduction to differential equations.

Prerequisite: MAT 120



MAT 122
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III (4 units)

This is the third and last course in calculus and analytic geometry for students majoring in mathematics, physical science, computer science, or engineering. In this course the concepts of calculus are extended to functions of more than one variable. The content includes three-dimensional analytic geometry and vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus.

Prerequisite: MAT 121



MAT 220
Differential Equations (4 units)

This course is the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications to problems in engineering and science. Methods are developed for solving equations of order one, linear equations of arbitrary order, and linear systems. Students are introduced to series methods, Laplace transforms, and numerical methods.

Prerequisite: MAT 122



PHY 150A
General Physics I
(Mechanics)
(4 units: 3 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

This course is the first in the physics sequence for majors in physics, chemistry, engineering, or other physical sciences. The general principles of mechanics are introduced at a calculus-based level. Specific topics include kinematics, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy momentum, rotation, and simple harmonic motion. A problem solving approach is used emphasizing both conceptual understanding and basic mathematical techniques. A laboratory program complements lecture.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in high school physics or PHY 120; MAT 120 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent



PHY 150B
General Physics II
(Electricity and Magnetism)
(4 units: 3 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

This course is the second in the physics sequence for majors in physics, chemistry, engineering, or other physical sciences. The general principles of electricity and magnetism are introduced at a calculus-based level. Specific topics include the electric field, Gauss' Law, electric potential, DC circuits, Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves. A problem solving approach is used emphasizing both conceptual understanding and basic mathematical techniques. A laboratory program complements lecture.

Prerequisites: PHY 150A, MAT 121 (may be taken concurrently)



PHY 150C
General Physics III
(Heat and Light)
(4 units: 3 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

This course is the third in the physics sequence for majors in physics, chemistry, engineering, or other physical sciences. The general principles of optics, thermodynamics, and modern physics are introduced at a calculus-based level. Specific topics include waves, geometric optics, wave optics (including interference, diffraction, and polarization), heat, thermal properties of matter, and thermodynamics. A problem solving approach is used emphasizing both conceptual understanding and basic mathematical techniques. A laboratory program complements lecture.

Prerequisites: PHY 150B, MAT 121 (may be taken concurrently)



PHY 150D
Physics IV
(Atomic Physics)
(4 units: 3 lecture units and 1 lab unit)

This course is the fourth in the physics sequence for majors in physics, chemistry, engineering, or other physical sciences. It includes an introduction to quantum physics emphasizing electronic structure of atoms and solids, radiation, and relativity at a calculus-based level. A problem solving approach is used emphasizing both conceptual understanding and basic mathematical techniques. A laboratory program complements lecture.

Prerequisites: PHY 150C, MAT 121 (may be taken concurrently)

 

 

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